Ideas Into Action
Home > Publications > Pathways to Outcomes

Pathways to Outcomes

Since 2002, Lisbeth B Schorr and Vicky Marchand have been compiling a broad collection of outcome-oriented findings about what it takes to improve the lives of children and families living in America’s low-income neighborhoods.  The Pathway to Outcomes series been revised and updated with funding from The Omidyar Group. 

In addition to updating the literature review, this project allowed the original team to incorporate lessons learned and to connect to the increasing number of organizations working on comprehensive results-based initiatives.  The revised Pathway includes a strong focus on the contexts for achieving results: public policy, systems, and communities (see Component of Effective Early Childhood Initiatives) and a streamlined overview (see Strategies for Impact).  The new Pathway will be available on the CSSP website in July 2014. 

To support users, CSSP offers the services of a curator to draw on the knowledge base in response to specific questions and customize materials. Please contact Vicky Marchand for more information.
 

Pathways to Outcomes: School Readiness and Third Grade Success Pathway

Pathways to Outcomes: Youth Pathway

Pathways to Outcomes: Prevention of Child Abuse

 

 

Additional background on the use of evidence in working toward outcomes can be found here:  

"Keynote Address, NeighborWorks Symposium, December 12, 2012" 
An exploration of why we need a broader definition of evidence in designing, understanding and evaluating efforts to solve the pressing problems facing children, families and communities in our country today.

"Broader Evidence for Bigger Impact," Stanford Social Innovation Review, Fall 2012  
A call for the reconciliation of competing approaches to the kinds of evidence that funders, policy makers and program designers should consider credible to enable practitioners to achieve the breakthrough impacts. 

Lisbeth B. Schorr and Frank Farrow, "Expanding the Evidence Universe:  Doing Better By Knowing More," December 2011
The paper explores how we might make use of all the evidence we now have from multiple sources, including research, theory, practice, as well as the findings from program evaluations, and how we might aggressively gather new evidence about the nuanced and powerful strategies for change that are currently emerging.

`Print
Site by Trilogy